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on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%? i'll take spain over the united states at this point any day. >> all right. >> so don't
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that. that is why energy is more expensive because we import a lot of that. if every country is doing that, its race to the bottom how quickly they can devalue their currency. >> we trade with so many different nations. we trade with europe and certainly with china. look at our trade imbalance and you can figure that out. europe has only a handful of countries that are doing decently? >> there is about six. they are in the nor
have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech could be an air yeah wirarea. what kind of gived guidelines can you give to investors so they can take advantage of these trends. >> there is a huge boom inenergd healthcarhealthcare in particule new healthcare system is going to be a lot. you have to look at companies that have had success but need more capital to get to the next level. exploration and production companies and energy that have done well and need capital. you can raise it or you can join forces with somebody else. very often the decision is to merge and not raise capital and take that risk. >> susie: and in tech what should they look for. tech is such a huge area we have a few seconds left what are your thoughts? >> look at the base companiesan. the kind of service that's county of victoria to their -- o their base line services. >> thanks bob, have a greatweek. bob pr profusek. >> susie: the price of gold fell slightly today, as the fiscal cliff drama in washingt
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
for 2012, up the russell 2000 up 12 percentage points, the s&p up 31, -- s&p up 11. but it's europe, europe actually ended up looking pretty darn good. germany up 30%. i mean, i look at that, and i say all of the fear that was out there including the euro stocks, 600 did unbelievably beautifully. and you say, my goodness, if you went toward the worst, most fearsome place, europe, you would have done way better than here in the u.s.. >> yeah, absolutely. well, it's like everything that happens in nature as well as the markets and the equity markets. when things get stretched too far one way, they will come back to a happy medium. we saw that in the equity markets this year. they were the best performing asset classes of all the places you could put your money, and it's not without knowing what's going on when you had unprecedented types of money flows coming from central banks around the globe, that money had to go somewhere. the u.s. market has performed very well. by the time we get done today, especially on the fiscal cliff talks, we're going to be up about 14% in the s&p 500. the leaders
are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important thing inability or reduced ability to divide one's ability. >> it's less debilitating than alcohol. canadian study shows those driving within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another affect that we see are those driving under marijuana reduced ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i feel we are in unchartered territory. >> the limit is five nanograms per blood sample. impairment is equal to alcohol. >> heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> to say that two hits or two dosals would get me 5 nangram, it is impossible to make that. >> the compound in pot is thc, and it's stored in fat. user could test positive weeks after smoking. bottom line this is going to be argued and litigated. in alcohol we started at is 1.5 and game down
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
german blue chips, especially when you consider the fact that we are in and out of recession in europe, we have a real malaise in front of a lot of sectors such as the carmakeres and that hasn't stopped the likes of vw, the likes of porsche, the likes of bmw having a very strong 2012. that's despite the fact that gm's opel said it will cut capacity by 20% in 2013. so we are seeing at the moment a real complacency regarding the fiscal cliff, but it's low volumes here as we enter the last hour or so of trading. back to you. >> we also have some news to bring you, broken last night. i expect john harwood talked about it on the special that we did last night. secretary of state hillary clinton is in a new york hospital this morning being treated from a blood clt clot resulting from a concussion you suffered earlier this month. she had been expected to return to work this week. >>> coming up, deal or no deal? we're going to look beyond the fiscal cliff and what it will mean for the markets. we have jim o'neill. he's going to join us to talk about whether he is bullish for the start of 2013
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
. that was growth of the growth off the growth. melissa: right. >> the lesson to be learned from europe isn't to be careful on cutting. it is to be careful on hike being, on hiking taxes. the beast is the government, in my opinion here. the beast is the government. you don't reward the beast by giving it more food, more dollars. that's what i near is going on here. melissa: yeah. lori: the president's desire to get rid of the debt ceiling limit at all, what kind of ramifications, what could happen? are we looking at another debt downgrade? a second downgrade could be really, really -- >> here is what i agree with him. this charade we go through every few months on the debt limit. republican presidents, democratic presidents, mark zandi from moody's it does damage our credibility. i agree to something like that. i didn't like fiat saying i will handle the debt thing. that would be like letting me run loose in a best buy electronics store. not a good idea. i understand where he is coming from. we do have a find a way we can, you know, not hold our entire government hostage to these debt ceili
and there is some turmoil over europe's economy and the founder of wikilocations continues to be under siege. en toa krause looks at the year's major world news. >> reporter: terrorists launched a deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya on september 11th. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed. the arab spring triggered civil war in syria. more than 40,000 people died as rebels try to force out dictator assad. u.s. troops are now in neighboring turkey. the muslim brotherhood rose to power in egypt after the country's first free election. but hundreds of thousands are rejecting president morci's iron hand. israeli forces bombed gaza for eight straight days in november. retaliating after hamas militants fired long-range rockets across the border. forensic experts exhumed the body of yasser arafat to try to determine if he was poisoned eight years ago. north korean celebrated the firing of a long-range rocket into orbit. many believe the communist nation is advancing its nuclear technologies. taliban gunmen tried to assassinate a pakistani school girl who spoke out ag
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
these days. >> and i want to take a look at a longer term chart. in the midst of all this in europe and everywhere else, that is a chart that a lot of people would be envious of. jim, we can't neglect what's happening today in washington. has it affected you at all? have you made any plans? are you doing anything based on what these publioliticians are wrangling' about? >> certainly, it's slowed our growth. >> it has? >> in the couple of years, it's slowed even faster. government was weaker than normal for the quarter and i think we'll see that going forward a bit. it's hurting for us. we have a lot of cash, we have no debt. so it's not a major, major impact. certainly the lack of clarity is hurting our customers and that ultimately affects us, as well. >> so you do business with the government and also the uncertainty around the policy has affected some of your customers to some extend? >> oh, absolutely. now, we sell a high valued proposition, so we do well in downed markets. so at the same time it's hurt us with some government customers. overall, the lack of certainty has led pe
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
to happen here. there's a huge stake. everyone realizes. europe has got its problems. germany starting to feel the effects of the global, of the downturn in europe. china, cutting its growth forecasts, india doing the same. the last thing anyone on the world stage needs right now is for the u.s. to start sliding back into recession. but you know, let's be clear here. that's, that would take some time. there would still be time for some kind of a deal. but it's the uncertainty that is really driving everybody's nerves in all of this. it's going to affect commodity prices in countries like brazil. countries like russia, everybody is in this together. waiting to see what happens up there. >> you're absolutely right. we're going to be watching those international markets to see how everybody is reacting. it's this whole big chain, jim, thank you for that back home, the senate is still trying to work towards a deal as jessica just told us, senator harry reid earlier said that he is in fact hopeful about reaching a deal. listen. >> with 36 hours left until the country goes over the cliff, i
in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints, kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact, upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation, thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet, so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their hopes were going to be realized. and so it really did put a lot of people in motion during
&p looks attractive. the other thing is the policy mandate in places like europe believe it or not for the first time in a really long time they actually may be clearer than the u.s. >> chris, is there something about the fiscal cliff, deal or no deal, that makes you concerned about u.s. equities versus international ones? >> well, yes. but i think it's a relative concern. because i think risk assets around the world are attractively valued right now. but you're absolutely right. regardless of what sort of deal we get today or in the next three months, the fact of the matter is it will have an adverse impact next year. the question is is it going to be bad enough to throw the country into recession or not? we suspect not. and you're seeing today that it looks like a -- that both political sides have been able to find common ground on the tax issue which we think is pertinent in erm thes of the economic impact. but having said that, again, the policy response we think in europe ever since draghi has been in has been consistent and very conducive to risk markets going up. >
. global travel company, expedia.com. recently announced they're growing in europe. seagate technology has a 5% dividend and a plan to cut the number of outstanding shares. and ebay could well be positioned to take advantage of the trend. now apple, despite a tough quarter, the launches of the iphone 5 and the ipad mini helped them return over 30% this year. though it's been a tough three months. it wasn't all positive in tech for everyone. marvel technology group down. the chip company hurt by a ruling against them in a lawsuit. hewlett-packard hurt. most recently because of possible accounting issues. and dell hurt by a pc industry that has well passed its prime. they've been looking to more of a services driven business. the biggest ipos of the year didn't turn out as spectacularly. facebook shares went down to 26.60 today. >> love that. thank you. >>> the nasdaq did better than the dow in 2012 and even better than the s&p 500. so now let's get tech predictions for next year and hold on to your hats, guys. because they range from microsoft taking over rim to twitter going public. great
: i have seen people wait an hour to see, in effect words. if you go to ancient cathedrals in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their
in burma, or eastern europe, shows that history has a hopeful direction capable of miracles. there is a part of every soul but longs for freedom and any government built on oppression is built on sand. vast historical changes often begin in the single mind, a single heart and a hope that now grows in burma is a tribute. one of the most repressive governments on earth attempted to isolate and silence 1-woman. it must have seemed an easy task. instead of the regime encountered and it immovable object and its legitimacy broke against her character. she became a symbol of courage, perseverance and defiance, a symbol that integrity was still possible in burma and the symbol became an inspiration for activists, monks and millions around the world. when her long isolation ended some of us finally met aung san suu kyi in person and found not a symbol but a woman, of tremendous humor, honesty and grace. that only increased our admiration. when political prisoners are freed and normal political life revised it is the start of new tests. burma needed aung san suu kyi's courage and pati
: clinton develops a stomach virus was on that trip to europe and had to cancel a subsequent visit to morocco. a few days later back in the u.s. she fainted and fell. her aides say it was the result of dehydration. on december 15 the state department announced that clinton had sustained a concussion in that fall. doctors recommended, quote, that the secretary continue to rest and avoid any strenuous activity and strongly advised her to cancel all work events for the coming week. clinton canceled the december 20 appearance before a congressional committee to testify about the attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi. she also missed the december 21 nomination of senator john kerry to succeed her. on december 27, the state department announced that clinton would return to work in the new year. it was three days later when her spokesperson said she had been hospitalized. secretary clinton had a blood clot once before in 1998 as first lady. she said she developed one in her leg from her nonstop flying around the country. as secretary of state that nonstop travel continued. she visited 11
%. our major trading partners, britain and europe and canada -- they are only 16%. so there is a very good reason why just about every industrial country has a really low capital gains tax rate. that's because policymakers just about everywhere know that low capital gains tax rates are crucial for a growth of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every mjor high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate profits are tax
democrats and in europe. they need some time to be more able -- to be able -- they are very successful on the side of the opposition. right now in sight of the government, there is a tremendous responsibility. we have seen that from the parliamentarian elections were the muslim brothers in egypt but the majority. until the results, they lost 4 million of votes. this is why we have a responsibility in the united states to support democratic institutions not allowing any ideological block to hijack the revolution or the institutions. at the same time, not taking sides. that will have a negative impact. it is an important asset to combat the jihad tests or the extremists. -- jihadists or the extremists. the muslim brothers in tunisia .ccused this is why we have to a differentiates between the muslim brothers and the girondists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. -- jihadists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. are they committed to values. this is the most important thing. >> and we have seen in syria where they had a violent fight between the muslim brothers and the ala
in europe on the big 75% tax rate that the french wanted to pass for the rich. >> the breaking news that a french court said a 75% tax rate on individuals is unfair. so it has been rejected. the court court says unless you apply it to households it is not fair to single out individuals. that means 75% tax at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in t
headlines all over the world. conor powell begins with a financial crisis in europe. >> the eurozone continues with a huge financial hole. standard & poor's downgraded in nine countries in the union. financial ministers reaching an agreement on another greek bailout. a lot of trouble with debt ridden banks. europe demanding an end to stringent austerity measures that all this resulted in the eurozone going back into another recession. thirty-two people dead, including two americans off the coast of italy. when the cost of concorde a cruise ship runs aground >> more than 79 people killed and 8000 injured. a district court says that they would like to oust president hosni mubarak to life in prison. and mohammed morsi, of the muslim brotherhood party takes charge for it in november, he grants himself absolute power that brings thousands of protesters to the streets of cairo, egypt. three members of a russian all-female punk band stage a protest against vladimir putin are sent to jail for hooliganism. inciting worldwide protest and demand for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the
with someone like mr. storm, you had a westerner, someone who had a passport could travel in western europe and someone who wouldn't fit the typical security profiles. >> storm said he had no doubt his efforts led to the death of al awlaki. while the story might be true there are a lot of people involved in these operations. >> absolutely. i think there's never a single piece to the puzzle in finding a terrorist like anwar al awlaki. there's usually multiple angles multiple sources, multiple ways of intelligence sources finding someone like him. no doubt there were operatives giving us information, giving other intelligence services information, but that's how intelligence work happens. it's putting pieces of a puzzle together, and i this i that's what happened here with finding and ultimately killing of anwar al awlaki. >> i was fascinated to see the western bride angle that awlaki would like that western bride. it makes sense why he has the western recruits but a western bride as well? >> keep in mind rebecca, that anwar al awlaki was born in the united states, made
repaired, if you will, greece, now. we don't have to worry about europe at least until the second half of the year. we have stability in china because of economic activity and that was a drag and then we have the doj promising tease and the federal reserve doing the same thing and all of a sudden it is not the world looking over the cliff, but we 3-quarters of the world looking the other way starting to come back and that is the difference. tracy: what happens? we are stealing from queue to. >> we always steal from one quarter to another. tracy: europe might come back to bother us again the second half of the year. could that mean an okay first half, second half disaster's again? >> we never have smooth sailing at anything. sell in may and go away. which works sometimes and doesn't work. what we feel good about is investors are forced with a problem that dividend taxes are going to go up. to me that is a good problem because it is going to take investors out of the safety of the blue chips and staples and utilities and put them into faster growth equities. riskier. if we look at the ri
their defense tab. you can't do it -- there's nobody to bail out america the way germany's bailing out europe. >> john boehner was on the program the other night. he said hey, i wasn't consulted about this latest offer. i wish i was. this talk about republican conservatives, tea party members that were purged from certain committees because they had a criteria list if they didn't meet or match the leadership vote schedule. is that a message to the more conservative way of the republican party? >> i think so. he's absolutely right to be disturbed about it. it's not john boehner's job to make this math add up. it's not john boehner's job to find ways of funding a three and a half or four trillion dollar budget. it's insane. if the democrats want to have a three and a half, four trillion dollar federal budget, fine. they can be the party of that. there ought to be a party that represents an alternative and john boehner is saying no, we'll help you close that gap. who needs the republican party? >> you think there will be an internal squabble, a fight, maybe an attempt to cede him in the end? >>
in europe. but, the consequences would be relatively minor. it is more exposed to it's own difficulties, and it's own issues, than to what happens elsewhere in the world, because it is such a large player. >> so we're our own 5,000 pound gor ri gorilla. >> let me ask you as a final question, january 2nd arrives, no deal, what will we notice first? >> lack of citizen, markets would react very quickly, and it would react in the stock market really taking a hit. i would say it will depend on what's on the horizon. the debt ceiling, and the long-term deficit and debt levels, that would be different. >> so that plan, even if it's a little late, would, you think, be better -- >> better comprehensive fix. >> thank you for joining us. >> when we return, the perils of doing nothing. >> reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> this is the same republican leadership that had the house and senate in session barely a day. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart atta
we got now is the soviets dominating europe instead of the germans. we fought a war for this? >> did joe's outspokenness against world war ii make kennedy more of a hawk and jfk ending up being more of a hawk in response to his father? >> that's a great question. i don't know. i think part of what jfk does is follows his father. his father was an isolationist, but he was also in favor of huge military budgets to build up missile systems and every conceivable type of defense. first against the germans so they could never invade the united states and against the soviets. jack kennedy inherits this notion that we have to be strong and have a strong defense. >> interesting. >> yeah, absolutely. >> i could go on all day. this book looks like it's fascinating. joseph p kennedy, you talk about a rich tapestry of a biography that you got to dig into. i can't wait to dig into it. the book is called patriarch. check it out. first the white house soup of the day. we know you are asking. no holiday leftovers here. chicken noodle. i don't remember any chicken at any of the christmas parties. we'l
in europe is something elsewhere, because of the euro situation, you have to cut people's wages, to make those countries competitive again. that's a completely different issue. austerity in terms of reversing this tremendous increase we've had in government spending over the last four years, we've gone from 2.9 trillion to 3.8 trillion in spending, a 30 odd percent increase in four years. and there's no trend or motivation so far to reverse that or normalize that. so again, austerity for the public sector is stimulus for the private sector. >> all right. shawn tully, thank you very much. >> happy new year, don. >> you too as well. >> thank you, don. >>> a mom and her kids reunited after they had been missing for nearly a week, thanks to a cnn viewer. thanks to you. hear their story next. hes, fev. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> it unfolded right here on cnn cnn. teresa nash came on our show making a desperate plea for help to find her two missing boys.
were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to his from our family. this from president george h.w. bush ailing in the hospital but speaking out in his statement about the passing of general schwarzkopf. general scales, are you still with us by phone? did we l
is ready to grow next year. china has bottomed, europe has stabilized so there are some things in place that can help offset these additional taxes and cuts to government spending. >> now, you mentioned two years ago shall the spending cuts, the fiscal cliff, it was designed to force washington to deal with the nation's long-term debt problem. and instead, here we are, a final hour, who knows what will happen next and i want to specifically ask you about the lack of progress on those structural issues like entitlement spending because even the plan c isn't touching that. so that means regardless of what happens before january 1st, investors will then be dealing with a certain degree of political risk long-term after the fiscal cliff deadline has passed. so, how will that affect the market on the economy in terms of spending cuts? >> well, my fear is that the compromise will be that we get the tax increases and they postpone the spending cuts and that's the ultimate objective. >> yes he. >> and you know, that is something that the economy will recover from and something will adjust to. r
to you. europe has seen its own budget crisis over the past few years. are there any valuable take aways that lawmakers in the u.s. could use as guidance? >> i'm not sure. i thought very long and hard since i knew we were discussing this for parallels. and i think what you really come down to is that of compromise. and the ability to do a deal. when in the face of opposition, you just have to get something done because the ramifications are so serious if you don't. in the case of the eurozone, you had 27 countries and nobody could agree and you had different political philosoph s philosophies. that sounds similar to the fiscal cliff and certainly the eurozone pushed things to the absolute limit. almost to breaking point during the summer where again and again they would not agree until disaster was on their doorstep. that's the similarity to what we're seeing tonight. >> i know. we're hearing that negotiations are ongoing. they are continuing. there are a number of issues on both sides. ryan lizza following this. it appears as though obviously some elements of this have to be pushed for
a stomach illness following a whirl wind trip through europe. that virus led to extreme dehydration, which caused her to faint and sustain a concussion. according to doctors at george washington university hospital and mt. kisko medical center, she's been recuperating at home since early december. secretary clinton also suffered a blood clot in her knee when she was first lady. in her autobiography, she said that doctors attribute it to her nonstop flying. now 65 years old clinton's air travel has only increased. illness has sidelined clinton during the final weeks of her term as secretary of state, causing her to cancel a december 20th appearance at congressional hearings into the attack on the benghazi consulate and the announcement of senator john kerry's nomination to succeed her as secretary of state. >> he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. >> reporter: clinton's last public appearance was december 7th in belfast, northern ireland. she spoke then about her upcoming retirement and said she looked forward to having time to relax and th
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